Last edited by Nasho
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

1 edition of Cowpea (Vigna sinensis) found in the catalog.

Cowpea (Vigna sinensis)

by W. J. Morse

  • 87 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forage plants,
  • Cowpea,
  • Research

  • Edition Notes

    StatementW. J. Morse, Scientific Assistant
    ContributionsUnited States. Bureau of Plant Industry
    The Physical Object
    Pagination2 pages ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25902025M
    OCLC/WorldCa927543432

    A delectable, nutty flavored cowpea perfectly suited to the screaming hot summer heat in the South. This classic southern cowpea has long been a favorite of our customers for its impressive heat tolerance and wild productivity. The plants grow quickly in the face of intense weather and will produce tons of tasty, tender pods in a sweetheart. of this book, who was the Principal Cowpea Breeder at IITA from to , covering more than 27 years. Working through a team of researchers and participatory international testing of the new cowpea varieties, Dr. Singh was able to catalyze the release of over.

    Get this from a library! Cowpeas: utilization. [W J Morse] -- "The cowpea plant may be fed to live stock as pasturage, hay, or ensilage, and the seed may be used as human food. Cowpeas are not grown for seed more generally because of the uncertainty of the. Cultigroup Unguiculata is the most diverse of the cultivated subspecies unguiculata and has the widest distribution. It is commonly called cowpea and is grown in Africa, India and Brazil. These are prostrate, semi-erect, erect or climbing. Pods are coiled, round, crescent or .

      Cowpea definition is - a sprawling herb (Vigna unguiculata synonym V. sinensis) of the legume family related to the bean and widely cultivated in the southern U.S. for forage, green manure, and edible seeds; also: its edible seed —called also black-eyed pea, field pea. The obvious strike against cowpeas is price. Our local feed store doesn't stock cowpea seeds, and ordering cover crop seeds online is expensive. Buckwheat seeds bought locally clock in at a bit over a dollar a pound, but once you factor in shipping, cowpea seeds cost me about $ per pound even if you buy them in bulk. Now, to be fair, the.


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Cowpea (Vigna sinensis) by W. J. Morse Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cowpea: The Food Legume of the 21st Century (ASA, CSSA, and SSSA Books). The story of cowpea (black-eyed peas) is a fascinating example of how science can solve the world's biggest problems―even more fascinating is the story of the scientist behind the research.

B.B. Singh wrote this book to serve as an accessible summary of cowpea breeding, management,and : $ Book January Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata, (L) walp, a multifunctional crop providing food for man and livestock and serving as a valuable dependable revenue generating commodity in many.

from book Chickpea (pp) Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata, Cowpea book an important grain legume adapted to the sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) where it contributes to the nutrition, health, and income of.

Cowpea is a legume that is extensively grown throughout sub-Saharan Africa. It is a subsistence crop, often intercropped with sorghum, maize and pearl millet. The grain provides valuable protein and the leaves are used as a nutritious vegetable.

(IPM CRSP, ). Millions of african farmers grow cowpea, some two hundred million africans consumeFile Size: 1MB. Given quantities like that, one might question this species’ inclusion in a “lost crops” book.

But the cowpea’s widespread occurrence and importance in the lives of the most malnourished makes this particular grain legume critical for lifting the nutritional baseline. In this chapter, several characteristics of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), including nutritional and nutraceutical Cowpea book, and economic and social aspects of production were analysed with the objective to demonstrate that cowpea is a culture suitable for inclusion in food security programs.

Cowpea is rich in diverse nutrients, highlighting high levels of : Alexandre Carneiro da Silva, Dyego da Costa Santos, Davair LopesTeixeira Junior, Pedro Bento da Silv. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.), originated in Africa and is widely grown in Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia and in the southern United States.

It is chiefly grown for grain and animal fodder. Download Visual Reference Images from our eBook Page. Cowpea has been cultivated as a crop for thousands of years, and is well-placed to improve the sustainability of modern agricultural systems.

As part of a NIFA-funded project, Dr Louis Jackai, Dr Beatrice Dingha and Dr Mulumebet Worku and their students at North Carolina A&T State University are carrying out research that could open up wider avenues to the cultivation of this.

Cowpeas. Cowpea is a multi-purpose crop in the United States with cultivars developed as dry pulse for human food, fresh vegetable types [35], and many older.

A review of the earlier literature on the cowpea was presented by Rachie and Roberts (), whereas a book by staff of the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria, on cowpea research, production and utilization (Singh and Rachie, ) is a compendium of later information on the by: 3.

Taxonomy, genetics, and breeding. Origin, taxonomy, and morphology of vigna unguiculata (L.) walp. Cowpea genetics: a review of the recent literature.

Recent advances in cowpea breeding. Wide crossing in African vigna species. Isozyme markers and taxonomic relationships among vigana species. Flavonoid HPLC fingerprints of wild vigna s: 2. The story of cowpea (black-eyed peas) is a fascinating example of how science can solve the world's biggest problems—even more fascinating is the story of the scientist behind the research.

B.B. Singh wrote this book to serve as an accessible summary of cowpea breeding, management,and : American Society of Agronomy. Cowpea is eaten by deer as forage, and is commonly used in food plots for deer. A variety of birds, including wild turkey, eat the seeds and the plant can be used by quail as cover.

Some varieties of cowpea are used specifically for wildlife purposes (Ball et. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.), an annual legume, is also commonly referred to as southern pea, blackeye pea, crowder pea, lubia, niebe, coupe or frijole. Cowpea originated in Africa and is widely grown in Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia and in the southern United States.

Publication of this most appropriately titled book, Cowpea: The Food Legume of the 21st Century is very timely and extremely useful because there has not been any comprehensive book written on cowpea before now.

This book fills a major gap that has existed for a long time and provides information on the latest research findings as well as. This book, based on studies conducted in Ghana, investigates possible differences in the cowpea weevil from two agroecological zones in Ghana.

maculatus from the Coastal savanna and the Forest savanna transition zones were studied to find out whether changes have occurred in their generic status.

Cowpea is a hardy crop but it hosts many pests that at-tack vegetables, including leafminers, whiteflies, leaf-hoppers, mites, thrips, and aphids. Cowpea’s attraction for insects may be an advantage if the planting also at-tracts a sizable population of beneficial insects, but it isFile Size: 51KB.

Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), an indigenous legume to sub-Saharan Africa, is mainly grown in the dry savanna areas as an intercrop with millets, sorghum, groundnut and grains rich in protein are consumed in different forms in several parts of the tropics.

The average grain yield of cowpea in West Africa is approximately kg/ha, which is much lower than its potential yields. Cowpea can be planted in mixtures with buckwheat or sorghum-sudangrass to maximize its potential to suppress weeds. It is often interseeded into corn for weed suppression (Clark, ).

Although cowpea is known to be a quick-growing weed-fighter, it is less successful at suppressing perennial grasses, so cultivation of rows may be required for. Cowpea, (Vigna unguiculata), annual plant within the pea family (Fabaceae) grown for its edible legumes.

The plants are thought to be native to West Africa and are widely cultivated in warm regions around the world. In addition to their use as a protein-rich food crop, cowpeas are extensively grown.The cowpea, although belonging to the genus Vigna, is closely related to species of the section Strophostyles of Phaseolus.

It is a native of India and the region northwestward to thesouthern part of the Trans-Caspian District, but has been a cultivated crop for two thousand years or more.

It was intro duced into the West Indies in the latter.IMAGE: Bush-type vegetable cowpea is an important high-protein legume more. Credit: CSSA. Septem The story of cowpea (black-eyed peas) is a fascinating example of how.