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Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

6 edition of Chaucer and Langland found in the catalog.

Chaucer and Langland

historical and textual approaches

by George Kane

  • 305 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Athlone Press in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400 -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • Langland, William, 1330?-1400?,
  • English poetry -- Middle English, 1100-1500 -- History and criticism.,
  • English poetry -- Middle English, 1100-1500 -- Criticism, Textual.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [242]-295)

    StatementGeorge Kane.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPR313 .K3 1989b
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 302 p. ;
    Number of Pages302
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2253136M
    ISBN 100485113252
    LC Control Number89130480

    While Langland's poem was immediately popular and influential, it was Chaucer who stood at the head of a literary tradition within a generation of his death. John Bowers asks why and how Chaucer, not Langland, was granted this position. About Chaucer and Langland. Professor Kane is widely regarded as the leading middle English textual and literary scholar of our time and this collection of his essays will be widely welcomed. They focus largely upon the texts of Chaucer and Langland and demonstrate in an exemplary way how critical issues can arise from meticulous textual study.

    COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle .   When first “published” in the fourteenth-century, William Langland’s Piers Plowman and the Mandeville-author’s The Book of Sir John Mandeville, each in their own right, went the number of extant manuscripts for both works suggests, they took the English nation by storm in the early decades of their reception history, not as instantaneous explosions .

      chaucer’s contemporary writers: gower and langland Almost contemporary with Chaucer were two other poets. One of them is identified as William Langley or Langland was Chaucer’s own equal, if not superior in intensity, though far less inferior in range and in art. Buy Chaucer, Langland and the Creative Imagination First Edition by Aers, David (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low Author: David Aers.


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Chaucer and Langland by George Kane Download PDF EPUB FB2

Although Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland together dominate fourteenth-century English literature, their respective masterpieces, The Canterbury Tales and Piers Plowman, could not be more different.

While Langland’s poem was immediately popular and influential, it was Chaucer who stood at the head of a literary tradition within a generation of his by: Although Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland together dominate fourteenth-century English literature, their respective masterpieces, The Canterbury Tales and Piers Plowman, could not be more different.

While Langland’s poem was immediately popular and influential, it was Chaucer who stood at the head of a literary tradition within a generation of his : $ Their historically- and theoretically-informed meditations on the nature of poetic discourse traced how the generation of Chaucer and Langland devised a category of the literary that could embody a ethos of engaged, worldly consensus and make that consensus available to imaginative and rational by: 1.

John M. Bowers is an internationally known scholar of medieval English literature with books on Chaucer, Langland, and the Gawain Poet.

Educated at Duke, Virginia, and Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, he taught at Caltech and Princeton before settling at the University of Nevada Las Vegas/5(13).

Although Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland together dominate fourteenth-century English literature, their respective masterpieces, The Canterbury Tales and Piers Plowman, could not be more different.

While Langland’s poem was immediately popular and influential, it was Chaucer who stood at the head of a literary tradition within a generation of his death.

Book Description. First published inthis study of two renowned later fourteenth century English poets, Chaucer and Langland, concentrates on some. "In Chaucer and Langland: The Antagonistic Tradition, John M.

Bowers advances a provocative argument in the field of Middle English literary studies while also providing a comprehensive and extremely useful overview of the most significant Langlandian and Chaucerian criticism of the last half century.4/5(3). 2 Chaucer and Langland and A.

Doyle’s legendary doctoral thesis, A Survey of the Origins and Circula- tion of Theological Writings in English, provides a magisterial appraisal of vernacu- lar book-production exactly contemporary with Chaucer’s career but almost.

Scholars refer to the author as "Langland" for the sake more of convenience than of accuracy. There is no proof that Chaucer knew Langland or his works, but London was not a large town (about 40 to 50, inhabitants) and Langland's work, as shown by the number of surviving manuscripts (over fifty), was very well known in his time.

The name of William Langland has a celebrity in the English language for his singular work—The Book of Piers the Plowman. In the English literature of the 14th century, Langland’s Piers the Plowman stands out as the most renowned work, save Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. Part of the book's strength is the degree to which Bowers shows just how much Chaucer and Langland scripted these consequences: because he provided a name around which a poetic lineage could be constructed ‘Chaucer’ was available as a founding figure, whereas ‘Langland’, whose signature so readily dissolved back into allegory, left no.

First published inthis study of two renowned later fourteenth century English poets, Chaucer and Langland, concentrates on some major and representative aspects of their work. Aers shows that, in contrast to the mass conventional writing of the.

Chaucer and Langland by George Kane,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.2/5(1). What Chaucer and Langland made, that is, the authorial materials most of us take on an act of faith as having essentially survived their manuscript transmission in the form of a series of assiduously though, at times, contentiously edited texts from the late nineteenth-century to this very day, has always presented us with grounds for the discernment of fascinating and telling.

Julia Bolton Holloway's The Pilgrim and the Book: A Study of Dante, Langland and Chaucer investigates major fourteenth-century texts, the Commedia, Piers Plowman and The Canterbury Tales, in the light of the medieval theory and practice of pilgrimage, especially concentrating on Emmaus and Exodus paradigms.

Holloway's analysis draws extensively on iconography, Author: Julia Holloway Bolton. Geoffrey Chaucer, (born c. /43, London?, England—died OctoLondon), the outstanding English poet before Shakespeare and “the first finder of our language.” His The Canterbury Tales ranks as one of the greatest poetic works in English.

He also contributed importantly in the second half of the 14th century to the management of public affairs as Missing: Langland. A study of the four major poets who flourished during the last 30 years of the 14th century (Chaucer, Gower, Langland and the "Gawain" poet).

The term Richardian refers roughly to the reign of Richard II.4/5(5). Both Langland's Piers Plowman and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, left unfinished at the poet's death inare much engaged with Christian theology, its incarnation in the church, and the religious role played by secular by: 2.

While Chaucer's writings suggest that he considered himself an heir, not a begetter, the notion of him as a father-figure standing at the head of a patrilineal literary tradition was formulated within a generation of his death. John Bowers asks how Chaucer, not Langland, was granted this position.

Imagination and traditional ideologies in Piers Plowman --Langland and the church: affirmation and negation --Langland, apocalypse and the Saeculum --Chaucer: reflexive imagination, knowledge and authority --Chaucer's Criseyde: woman in society, woman in love --Chaucer: love, sex and marriage --Imagination, order and ideology: The knight's tale.

Page have been in a slightly better position in relation to their own social groups than other women, the basic structure of the institution was the same throughout society.1 Conventional male attitudes to this institution, and the place of women in it, are well displayed in two works contemporary with Chaucer, the book translated by Eileen Power under the title The .The Shaping of English Poetry- Volume II: Essays on 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight', Langland and Chaucer [Gerald Morgan] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This second volume of essays under the title The Shaping of English Poetry continues the project set out in the Preface to the first volume.In its current form, the book seeks to answer the ques- tion as to why Chaucer, not Langland, became, in Dryden’s formulation, ‘‘the Father of English Poetry.’’ The .